Sword of Tiberius

by Samize in Models

Low-poly model based on ancient Roman gladius.


The model has 1335 faces and 1304 vertices.


Includes 2048x2048 PBR textures for color, roughness, metallic, normal map, ambient occlusion.


Wikipedia description:

The sword is made of iron (now heavily corroded) and the sheath of tinned and gilded bronze. The length of the sword is approximately 58 cm long by 8 cm wide. The decoration on the scabbard illustrates the ceding of military victory to Augustus by Tiberius after a successful Alpine campaign. Augustus is semi-nude, and sits in the pose of Jupiter, flanked by the Roman gods of Victory and Mars Ultor ('the Avenger'), while Tiberius, in military dress, presents Augustus with a statuette of Victory.

This prestigious weapon was likely to have been commissioned by a senior officer in the Roman army to celebrate a victory in the lengthy and bloody military campaigns in Germany. Victory in these campaigns was essential for the expansion and protection of the Roman Empire's border, and the symbolic act of presenting these victories to the emperor avoided the destructive rivalry between generals, which had previously brought down the Roman Republic.

Iron sword and tinned and gilded bronze scabbard (sheath). This object illustrates the ceding of military victory to Augustus by Tiberius after a successful Alpine campaign. Augustus is shown semi-nude, and sits in the pose of Jupiter, flanked by Victory and Mars Ultor ('the Avenger'), while Tiberius, in military dress, presents Augustus with a statuette of Victory. The shield on which the seated figure rests his left arm is inscribed in Latin, Felicitas Tiberi, while the shield held by Victory nears the legend, Vic[toria] Aug[usti].

Length: 57.5 centimetres (blade)Width: 7 centimetres (blade)Length: 8.5 centimetres (hilt (remaining))Thickness: 0.4 centimetres (blade)Length: 58.5 centimetres (scabbard)Width: 8.7 centimetres (scabbard)

Felicitas Tiberi [on shield of Augustus]

Vic[toria] Aug[usti] [on shield held by Victory]

The iron sword and its decorated bronze scabbard was almost certainly commissioned for a senior officer to commemorate a victory in the lengthy and bloody military campaigns in Germany. Victory in these campaigns was essential for the extension and protection of Rome's empire, and the symbolic act of presenting it to the emperor avoided the destructive competition between generals, which had brought down the Roman Republic.